Archives for the Category: Cool Cars

Your Old Cars Can Be Safe Too

Posted by admin on October 4th, 2015 in Category Car News, Cool Cars, Site News, Uncategorized (no responses)

Technology has advanced vastly when it comes to safety technology and vehicles, and now it can be added onto older cars as well.

This way you don’t have to be left out of the technological revolution. Audiovox makes a rearview camera that can be added on.

The rearview camera is one of the most popular of a growing list of add-on devices and services that promise to bring modern features to aging jalopies.

“Lane departure and collision warning, pedestrian warnings, high-beam control and traffic sign recognition — all of those can be retrofitted in a customer’s car,” said Elad Serfaty, a vice president at Mobileye, whose technology is built into a variety of vehicles from BMW, Volvo and other carmakers that offer collision detection and prevention.

A warning and monitoring system that can be added to older vehicles, like the Mobileye 660, costs roughly $1,000 including a professional installation, Mr. Serfaty said, but he pointed out that the benefits could outweigh the costs. A Highway Loss Data Institute study of Honda Accords and Crosstours equipped with lane departure and forward collision warnings, for example, found a 14 percent reduction in damage claims compared with models without the systems.

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What Makes The BMW 7 Series Stand Out From Other Cars

Posted by admin on September 5th, 2015 in Category Car News, Charity News, Cool Cars, Donation News, Site News, Uncategorized, World Charities (no responses)

BMW is well known for the quality of cars they make and the technology embedded within however with this new seven series you will stand out even more so.

With the proliferation of technology across all vehicle segments, luxury automakers have to work harder to differentiate their cars. After all, when Buick and BMW both have Apple CarPlay, there isn’t much brand discrepancy via the dashboard display.

The 7 Series is BMW’s flagship and therefore the German luxury car company’s technology standard-bearer. Previous generations debuted the first in-dash navigation system, active safety features and center-console infotainment controller, iDrive, which other automakers later adopted.

BMW boasts that the all-new 2016 7 Series features 24 new innovations, and that half of those are segment exclusives. I got a chance to test drive the new 7 Series at a press event earlier this week and came away impressed with these six new tech features.

Gesture Control

Not only is the new 7 Series the first BMW with a touchscreen, but to activate certain features it doesn’t even need to be touched. The 7 Series has gesture control thanks to an infrared camera positioned in the headliner that detects the position of a hand in a small sweet spot above the shifter. Twirling a finger clockwise increases the volume of the stereo and twirling it counter-clockwise decreases it. Simply pointing at the screen can perform answering a call on a connected Bluetooth phone or swiping a finger can ignore the call. Two gestures can also be programmed to control a pair of favorite features.

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50 States and 50 Favorite Cars

Posted by admin on August 18th, 2015 in Category Car News, Cool Cars, Fun and Humor, Site News, Uncategorized (no responses)

Each state is known for a certain thing and cars are no different, which car is your state known for?

If you were to take a list of the most popular cars in each state in the U.S., it’d be a pretty monotonous list. A bunch of Ford F-150s, some Chevy Silverado and Ram pickups, the odd Honda Accord or Toyota Camry here or there.

But we were curious: What car was the most distinctive in each state? What model of car did, say, California buy far more often than any other state in the Union? We turned to auto analyst Tom Libby of IHS Automotive to help us crunch the numbers. First, Libby pulled data about the make and model of every car sold in the U.S., and calculated the popularity of each by percentage using registration data. Then, he did the same at the state level, and compared each state to the national average.

“I compared the share for each model in, for instance, Alabama with the share of the same of model in the United States and came up with a ratio,” says Libby. “Then I basically ranked those ratios within each state. It’s an interesting methodology—you’re basically able to compare the individual demand of a model in a state with the individual demand at the national level, and see what ways is each state unique from the nation.”

Some states seem to conform to stereotypes—Texas loves the hulking Cadillac Escalade EXT, NPR-loving New England enjoys their Volvos, and in the rough country of North Dakota they love the GMC Yukon Denali XL. But there are surprises: Georgia, for instance, seems to have a thing for Nissan Leaf. “Georgia had very, very strong incentives to buy electric vehicles,” says Libby, referencing the fact that until very recently, the Peach State offered $5,000 in state tax credits (in addition to $7,500 in federal tax credits) to anyone who bought an electric vehicle. In other words, everyone who bought a Nissan Leaf in Georgia saved themselves a cool $12,500.

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6 Things That Need To Be Done Before Autonomous Driving Happens

Posted by admin on July 28th, 2015 in Category Car Donation, Car News, Charities, Charity News, Cool Cars, Donation News, Fun and Humor, Site News, Uncategorized, World Charities (no responses)

How much easier will it be as you go to work with your car driving for you? Will it be safer, can you get more done? However, you may need to wait for this automotive dream to become a reality.

As more than 800 engineers, software developers, transportation experts and other technical folks met last week in this Detroit suburb to discuss the risks and benefits of autonomous and connected vehicles, they were raising more questions than finding answers.

Here are six unsolved challenges that stand between the technologies’ potential and reality:

  1. Cybersecurity and privacy protection. Maybe this can’t be solved until there are thousands of pilot vehicles on our roads, but last week Wired magazine writer Andy Greenberg wrote about two cybersecurity experts who accessed a newer Jeep Cherokee’s computer brain through its Uconnect infotainment system and rewrote the firmware to plant their malicious code. The result: hip-hop began blasting through the stereo system, the AC turned to maximum force. Then the hacker’s code killed the transmission and brakes. We know autonomous cars will have even more software coding. One major attack and consumer confidence in the technology could be severely damaged.
  1. How much will these vehicles cost? Established automakers are introducing progressively more advanced autonomous features in their most expensive models. Ride-hailing or other fleet-based services such as Uber or Lyft will try to deliver their service at a lower price than competing options.

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New Trend, Renting Your Ride

Posted by admin on June 20th, 2015 in Category Car Donation, Car News, Charities, Charity News, Cool Cars, Donation News, Fun and Humor, Site News, Uncategorized, World Charities (no responses)

Investments change everyday, and the trends of how people can invest change as well. From silver, to housing, to own a business they are all very different. Today there is a new type of investment, by purchasing a new car to rent out to other people.

Car manufacturers are desperately seeking new ways to increase sales, maximize financial returns and address the changing needs of new generations like the millennial, but urging people to rent our their own brand new cars stretches credulity and will fall on stony ground.

News this week that BMW’s Mini will offer buyers of its cars the chance to offset the purchase price by renting out their vehicles surely won’t find any takers. BMW itself has a similar scheme called Drive Now, which board member Peter Schwarzenbauer has said is based on the idea from accommodation sharing web site Airbnb. Ford and GM have also joined in.

Schemes that allow people who don’t own cars to rent by the hour make much sense. This allows the young, who either can’t afford to own a new car, or don’t need one very often, to get wheels for specific jobs. It also allows makers of electric cars which nobody wants to buy, to get them off dealer lots and earn some money.

If it was a scheme that allowed, say, students to rent out their old clunkers to generate enough cash to pay for running costs and then some, it might make some sense. But is there anyone in the history of the world who bought a brand new car – whether it’s a little runabout or an expensive limousine, that would ever let a stranger drive off in it? The fact that they could afford a new car in the first place means the financial incentive just isn’t there.

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When Is Your Ride At The End Of It’s Life

Posted by admin on April 29th, 2015 in Category Car Donation, Car News, Charities, Charity News, Cool Cars, Donation News, Fun and Humor, Site News, Uncategorized, World Charities (no responses)

We all build that connection with our car, but sometimes it causes more troubles than its uses. At that point in time you might have to get a new car.


Perhaps it’s because of the cost and the sacrifices we make to own and operate them, or because they represent independence and mobility. But regardless, all this emotion can cloud our decision-making process when it comes to parting with our beloved daily driver. Many automakers invest as much time and energy in creating and developing an emotional bond between their products and their customers as they do in designing and building the vehicles themselves. If you doubt this, consider the amount carmakers spend on advertising each year compared to what they spend on R&D. While every auto manufacturer will supply an endless list of reasons why you should buy their particular product, few will help you decide when, and if, it’s time to leave your wheels by the curb and buy or lease something new. Here, then, is some advice to help make that decision easier.


Time and distance

Of all the auto executives I’ve met over almost four decades, only one ever admitted to the lifespan for which they design and build their vehicles to survive. While no auto company will admit it, the useful life for the majority of mainstream, non-luxury vehicles is about 10 years and/or 250,000 kilometers. While many cars, light trucks and SUVs may exceed that mark without exceptional repair or maintenance, a good percentage are relegated to the boneyard much sooner. A vehicle’s reliability takes a decidedly marked downturn once these milestones are passed. Does this mean we need to rush to the nearest dealership when the odometer clicks past that fateful mark? No, but it means it’s time create a succession plan. No matter the many variables when it comes to our relationships with cars, there’s one constant you can rely on: when you are forced to make a rushed decision on purchasing or leasing a vehicle (because your present chariot is dead in the driveway) it will cost you more than if you planned ahead.


Major repair estimate

Everyone dreads this call. They’ve had the family car towed into their repair provider because it failed to start/move/stop, and they get the estimate to overhaul/repair/replace something big. A good rule of thumb in these circumstances is to review your options of repairing or replacing your vehicle if a single-repair estimate approaches or exceeds its wholesale value. A quick internet tour of just about any used vehicle sales website can pinpoint this value. Just take the average asking price for the same vehicle in your area (with identical equipment and mileage) and subtract around $1,500 from a retailer’s asking price to come up with a wholesale value. Vehicles, unless it’s a collector classic, are a depreciating asset. Spending its entire value in one repair won’t double its worth.

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Technology Allows Insights on Teenage Driving Habits

Posted by admin on March 25th, 2015 in Category Car News, Cool Cars, Fun and Humor, Site News, Uncategorized (no responses)

Many teenage injuries in emergency rooms are due to preventable car accidents. Overall, teenage drivers drive faster and ride closer to the bumper in front of them than older drivers. Teenagers also are less likely to wear seatbelts then anybody else.

Chevrolet has announced that it will offer parents a creepy level of oversight when it comes to letting the kids borrow the family ride, and the NSA-style spying begins with the 2016 Malibu. A system dubbed Teen Driver will debut on the bow-tie brand’s newest mid-size sedan (which itself bows at the 2015 New York auto show). It allows parents to set speed alerts, limit audio volume, and even receive vehicle reports “so parents could use it as a teaching tool with their kids—they can discuss and reinforce safe driving habits.” Um, who’s ever heard of a productive, teachable conversation with a teenager?

Anyway, like Ford’s MyKey system (both current and future), Teen Driver lets parents with a Jason Bourne complex program speed warnings that flash when their child exceeds a preset velocity (from 40 to 75 mph) and set sound-system volume limits. Parents can also pull customizable reports full of juicy stuff, such as distance driven, top speed achieved, preset-speed warnings exceeded, stability-control events, anti-lock brake events, and forward-collision alerts and auto-braking events—on vehicles equipped with those systems.

Wily teens might just shut off stability control, traction control, and the like, but a PIN-protected menu enables parents to dictate just what features can or cannot be deactivated. In that way, control over the activation status of stability control, parking sensors, blind-spot monitoring, rear cross-traffic alert, forward-collision warning, automatic braking, daytime running lights, and traction control can all be wrested from your little speed junkie.

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The Unveiling of Discovery Velocity and Its Automotive Programming

Posted by admin on February 18th, 2015 in Category Car News, Cool Cars, Fun and Humor, Site News, Uncategorized (no responses)

Discovery Velocity is a new channel spread across Canada to deliver car-related programming. This channel will introduce old favourites that car enthusiasts have missed since the cancelation of Speed, as well as a variety of new programs designed to appeal to their interests.

“We’re looking to provide a really high-adrenaline, really exciting schedule and be somewhere that people can watch things they can’t see anywhere else in Canada,” said Director of Programming, Discovery Networks Lindsay Cowan Dotchison.

The new channel takes its name from Discovery Communications’ U.S. channel, Velocity, which was launched in 2011 and has a similar focus on automobiles.

“One of the reasons we launched Velocity in Canada is the huge success we saw with Velocity in the U.S.” said Dotchison.

“We looked to  Canada and we could see that our viewers were watching a lot of that big turbo factual content on Discovery.

“We saw really strong audiences with shows like Vegas Rat RodsFast N’ Loud and Overhaulin’ and we realized that we really wanted to create an exclusive home for factual, entertaining turbo content in Canada.”

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Shelby RTR loosely based on an old classic

Posted by admin on November 26th, 2014 in Category Cool Cars (no responses)

Shelby Mustangs are rare to begin with,  the Galpin-Fisker Rocket proves that you can take something and completely change it to something even better. It’s easy to see that Beau Boeckmann would want to add some interesting new upgrades to the Shelby RTR. He also said that he wasn’t joking when his inspiration for the new Galpin-Fisker Rocket came from some of the blue prints from a 1968 Shelby Mustang GT 500, or at least some parts did.

A joint project for Galpin Auto Sports owner Boeckmann and automotive designer Henrik Fisker (previously of Aston Martin DB9 and BMW Z8 fame before his ill-fated Fisker Karma venture), the Galpin-Fisker Rocket’s superfluous panels apparently hide a Ford V-8 that’s been souped-up to the tune of 725 hp.

Based on the 2015 Ford Mustang, Boeckmann and Fisker have re-interpreted the pony car, mostly in ways that affect air flow and dissipate heat. The front splitter is claimed to aid in engine cooling, while the dual air intakes on the hood draw cool air in for the engine to gulp down. Every body panel on the Mustang is carbon fiber, minus the doors and roof, and the rear bodywork is slightly wider than stock.

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